Embedded USB Host Controller IC

Advanced 25-Key Semi-Weighted USB MIDI Controller

Classic USB NES Controller for PC

$1.19
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  • TAG : 61-Key Semi-Weighted USB MIDI Controller
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  • I saw earlier this year where he had the great idea of converting an NES controller to work over USB and stuffing a flash drive inside to hold an emulator and some roms. Ed used a USB keyboard controller to “talk” to the computer. When you push Up, Down, A, or B on the NES controller it would send keyboard letter presses to the computer, and the emulator would map those keys to the appropriate NES buttons. I thought that was cool, but I looked around on the Internet and saw some other projects that used a microcontroller to implement a true joystick interface that would be recognized by any computer (PC and Mac), and without any special drivers. I decided to build the adapter on and like Ed, include a flash drive in the controller case.

    This is a unique USB hub handmade by Jason Roach, a geek crafter living in Monroe Center. As we can see from the images, the crafter used an authentic retro NES as the casing of the USB hub in order to display your love to the vintage game console. Of course, you can enjoy any video game with the tactile D-pad and two red fire buttons, but the game controller comes with 7 USB ports, so you can connect various USB gadgets with your computer, also including USB game controller. Apart from that, the USB hub ships with a 3-foot USB cable.

  • The Killamix-Mini is a compact USB controller housed in a sturdy brushed aluminium case with solid aluminium knobs. It is the perfect companion to your laptop, whether you are using a sequencer, DJ-ing or VJ-ing, just plug in the USB cable and go. Despite having only 9 knobs, 9 buttons and a joystick, the Killamix-Mini can in effect be 144 knobs,144 buttons and a joystick. By pressing a single knob you can select any MIDI transmit channel from 1 to 9, or, with a combination of two knobs, select the remaining channels 10 to 16. When you select a new MIDI channel, the current values of the knobs for that channel are stored so that they can be restored when you next select this channel, thus avoiding any parameter jump difficulties typical of units with traditional knobs and faders. When the values are restored, the LED rings around the knobs indicate their new positions.

    One thing to pay attention to is the power consumption. You must consume less than 100mA if you design a bus powered device. In addition your device must support USB suspend mode. When the pin named "sleep" on the FT232BM goes low then the device must consume less than 0.5mA. The latter is a very tough requirement to implement. The AVR supports an "idle mode" where it consumes less than 2mA and a "power down" mode where it consumes only 20uA. It seems however easier to wake up the Microcontroller from "idle mode". I have therefore decided to use "idle mode" even if this violates the USB specification a little bit. The optional background light of the display will be switched off and the whole circuit will then consume 3mA. 3mA is more than 0.5mA but the USB host controller chips can not measure the current so accurate that they will detect this. It should work.

    In Device Manager, USB game controllers are listed under Human Interface devices (in Devices by type view). If the controller does not appear in Device Manager, then USB may not be enabled in BIOS or EFI When you are prompted as you start your computer, enter BIOS or EFI setup, and enable USB.

    If USB is enabled in BIOS or EFI but the USB host controller does not appear in Device Manager (under Universal Serial Bus controllers), or a yellow warning icon appears next to the host controller name, then the version of BIOS or EFI may be outdated. Contact the maker or vendor for your computer and obtain the current version of BIOS or EFI.

    If the controller appears in Device Manager, right-click the controller name and then click Properties. Problems and suggested actions are displayed under Device status. For more information, click Related Topics.

    USB ports have a separate entry in Device Manager. To check the device status, click Universal Serial Bus controllers, right-click USB Root Hub, and then click Properties. If you do not see USB Root Hub, you might not have a USB port installed on your computer.

    You can also use the Hardware troubleshooter to diagnose and solve problems with hardware devices such as USB game controllers. Start the Hardware troubleshooter

  • In Device Manager, USB game controllers are listed under Human Interface devices (in Devices by type view). If the controller does not appear in Device Manager, then USB may not be enabled in BIOS or EFI When you are prompted as you start your computer, enter BIOS or EFI setup, and enable USB.

    If USB is enabled in BIOS or EFI but the USB host controller does not appear in Device Manager (under Universal Serial Bus controllers), or a yellow warning icon appears next to the host controller name, then the version of BIOS or EFI may be outdated. Contact the maker or vendor for your computer and obtain the current version of BIOS or EFI.

    If the controller appears in Device Manager, right-click the controller name and then click Properties. Problems and suggested actions are displayed under Device status. For more information, click Related Topics.

    USB ports have a separate entry in Device Manager. To check the device status, click Universal Serial Bus controllers, right-click USB Root Hub, and then click Properties. If you do not see USB Root Hub, you might not have a USB port installed on your computer.

    You can also use the Hardware troubleshooter to diagnose and solve problems with hardware devices such as USB game controllers. Start the Hardware troubleshooter

    Install a USB game controller

    Test a game controller

    Device Manager overview

    Using Device Manager


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    From the makers of the acclaimed "TableMike" and "TravelMike" series of microphones comes this powerful software application that can boost the efficiency of almost every computer user. Octopus USB Controller configures the buttons, keys or levers on any USB Human Interface Device (HID) to convert a push into action on a computer.

Yay! You're now following usb controller in your .

You can also use the Hardware troubleshooter to diagnose and solve problems with hardware devices such as USB game controllers. Start the Hardware troubleshooter