grammaticality - "To go to buy" or "to go buy"

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  • Bill's answer is great, except that I am going to buy food does not have the exact same nuance as I need to go (and) buy food: the former shows intention, while the latter shows necessity.

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    I need to go buy food is definitely acceptable in casual, spoken North American English. I am not sure about British English, though. Such a statement often includes and, for example I need to go and buy food, in the same manner as Please try and come does.

    Bill's answer is great, except that I am going to buy food does not have the exact same nuance as I need to go (and) buy food: the former shows intention, while the latter shows necessity.

    As far as a more formal, grammatically-correct version of the latter, I like Bill's example sentences using must and have to.

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    When I spoke with a friend of mine, I had noticed she used sentences similar to "I need to go buy food."

    Is it correct to say "to go buy," or should I say "to go to buy"?

    I know that I could say "I need to buy food," but I think that in "I need to go buy food," who is speaking is putting in evidence s/he needs to go and that s/he cannot stay any longer, or that her/his time to stay is limited.

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